Get the Most From Your Google Analytics Dashboard

main_logoI’m a big fan of Google Analytics.  The service is free, can go on multiple websites using just one account, and displays and processes stats beautifully. But the one thing that’s always annoyed me about Google Analytics is the default dashboard setup when you create a new website profile.

The dashboard is the place for the most important things to be. it should be the single place you can view to and get an overview of all the most important things about your website regarding your visitors without having to drill deeper or go through multiple pages or sub-sections.  But the default dashboard Analytics starts you off with is all wrong, and is almost never the information I really want to see.  Let’s see how we can fix this. Continue reading

Fixing IE7 Z-Index Issues with jQuery

For some reason, Internet Explorer 7 does some pretty funky things, and has several known bugs with it’s rendering engine that drive web developers like me crazy.  While most of the known bugs occur in relatively obscure situations and go largely unnoticed, there are a few that really stick out and cause web developers to waste many hours trying to fix them.  The way IE7 renders z-index stacking orders is one of them.

One way to fix many of the issues with IE7 is to dynamically reverse the default z-index stacking order of the elements on your page. This will ensure the elements higher in your HTML source will also have a higher z-index order on your page, solving most of the IE stacking issues. more If you’re using jQuery (the best Javascript library there is), here’s the quick fix:

$(function() {
     var zIndexNumber = 1000;
     $('div').each(function() {
         $(this).css('zIndex', zIndexNumber);
         zIndexNumber -= 10;
     });
});

This code will start with a z-index of 1000, and decrement the z-index for each DIV element of the page by 10, giving the first DIV a z-index of 1000, the second, 990, the third 980, and so on. Notice that the selector will find all DIV elements with the code “$(‘div’)”, using the same syntax as CSS selectors. If your HTML code has different requirements, feel free to change the code or the selector to suit your needs by following jQuery’s documentation on selectors.

Update for MooTools

(04/14/2009):

A generous commenter has posted the code for fixing z-index issues with MooTools 1.2:

if (Browser.Engine.trident){
     var zIndexNumber = 1000;
     $$('div').each(function(el,i){
         el.setStyle('z-index',zIndexNumber);
         zIndexNumber -= 10;
     });
};